Everything-But-The-Kitchen-Sink Smoothie

My brother Jack’s morning smoothie

I’m a little late with my blog post this week, as I just got back from visiting my brother Jack in Memphis, TN. Memphis is a great town for some great eats: Spare ribs, fried chicken, catfish, collards….yum! But in order to keep balanced nutritionally, Jack makes himself a smoothie for breakfast every morning. Above, you see bananas, pears, berries, spinach, pineapple, an entire lime, and a little bit of fresh ginger. Jack blended this mish-mash for a minute or two into a lovely, thick veggie malt. By the way, no added sugar….just the fructose in the ingredients. It was delicious!

Squash and Tomato Saute

Yellow crookneck squash and tomatoes

For my low-carb people, here is a nice side dish that pairs well with roasted chicken, turkey, meatloaf or cooked hamburger. It heats up well in the microwave or in the Hot Logic mini oven/lunchpail. (see https://myhotlogic.com for more info on this device.) And it is so colorful!

SQUASH-TOMATO SAUTE (2-3 servings)

  • Two tablespoons of pure olive oil
  • One large yellow crookneck squash, sliced crosswise
  • One medium sweet yellow onion, peeled and chopped
  • Two small on-the-vine tomatoes, chopped
  • Approximately 1 to 1 1/2 cups water
  • One small package of fresh dill, minced
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  1. In a medium saucepan, heat olive oil and add squash and onion. Saute for four minutes, constantly stirring.
  2. Add tomatoes and saute for one minute more.
  3. Add enough water to cover. Mix in minced dill plus salt and pepper to taste.
  4. Cover, and simmer for 10 minutes. Add additional water if needed.
  5. Serve immediately.

Adventures in Nuking: Egg Custard

Microwave Egg Custard

That’s right folks….I actually cooked egg custard in the microwave. The recipe can be found later on in this post.

I was brought up believing that microwave ovens are primarily useful to warm up frozen and precooked foods. And there are a couple of dishes that cook from a state of rawness very well; for example, salmon and trout.

However, I would never have imagined that nuked egg custard is possible until a friend gave me the following recipe a couple of weeks ago.

MICROWAVE EGG CUSTARD (4 Servings)

  • 1 3/4 cups whole milk *, warmed to room temperature
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 3 eggs
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • Nutmeg
  1. Warm milk to appropriate temperature (30 seconds in the microwave will do it.)
  2. In a medium mixing bowl, add milk, sugar, eggs, salt and vanilla.
  3. Using the lowest speed on rotary beater, mix until well combined. (You can use a whisk instead of an electric beater.)
  4. Pour the mixture into four 6-oz. round custard cups, filling 3/4 full.
  5. Sprinkle with nutmeg.
  6. Cook, uncovered, on High for 4 1/4 to 5 minutes, or until the custard starts to bubble.
  7. Cool, and then refrigerate.**

******

*Do not use low-fat or fat-free milk in this recipe. Otherwise, you will get watery custard. I have not yet tried vegan products like soy milk or nut milks.

**It is necessary to completely refrigerate the custard overnight prior to consumption, in order for it to set properly. Eaten cold, the custard will be firm with an creamy eggnog layer on the bottom of the cup. The recipe instructions indicate that you can warm the refrigerated custard by placing in the microwave for 30 seconds, then let stand 1 minute to distribute heat. I have not tried this recipe reheated, but it is very tasty cold.

For a brown bagger, this dish would be delicious as a breakfast item, perhaps with granola and/or blue berries. And egg custard is always good for dessert!

Recipe: Fajitas with Pre-Cooked Chicken

Every once in a while, I purchase one of those wonderful roasted chickens they feature in the deli section of my supermarket. It is, of course, a challenge to use up the entire bird when you’re preparing meals for just one person. But I just can’t resist the smell of those chickens! (By the way, I prefer the herb-roasted variety.)

Here’s one way to use the meat from a roasted chicken:

FAJITAS WITH PRE-COOKED CHICKEN (3-4 servings)

  • Three tablespoons pure olive oil
  • One sweet yellow onion, chopped
  • Two red bell peppers, cut into 1/2″x2″ slices
  • Three cups herb-roasted chicken, shredded
  • One packet (1.0 oz.) Lawry’s Chicken Fajitas mix
  1. In a large skillet, heat olive oil. Add onions and bell peppers, and saute for three minutes, or until the vegetables begin to soften.
  2. Stir in the Lawry’s Chicken Fajitas mix and cook for one more minute.
  3. Stir in the chicken and cook for two more minutes.

*******************

I find that making this dish ahead of time, wrapping it tightly and placing in the frig overnight helps to incorporate the flavors into the chicken better. This dish re-heats well in the microwave, Crockpot Lunch Warmer, or Hot Logic convection oven (see the “Gadgets” section for more on these brown bag devices). It’s delicious with a side of re-fried beans and/or warmed up corn tortillas.

Hot Logic Demo: Frozen Ravioli Cooked in Its Own Container

Hot Logic Mini Convection Oven

I am increasingly impressed at the things my new portable Hot Logic thermal bag can do. (The Hot Logic mini is a portable convection oven/lunch bag in which you can cook hot meals for lunch.)

In my last blog, I described a successful demo where I cooked a lamb dish in the bag within two hours.

This time, I decided to test the manufacturer’s claim that one can cook frozen dinners in the Hot Logic….without opening the cardboard container.

Below, you see an unopened one-serving package of frozen ravioli that I placed in my Hot Logic mini.

Frozen dinner sitting in my Hot Logic mini oven

Two hours later, I opened up the Hot Logic device, and then the package. (Two hour cooking time per Hot Logic manual instructions.) The cardboard was not burned or otherwise damaged. The interior container and plastic film cover were not damaged, either. The food came out piping hot and ready to eat. Lovely!

As mentioned before: If you are interested in finding out more about this product, you can go to https://myhotlogic.com or type in “hot logic” at amazon.com.

Demonstration: Hot Logic Thermal Bag

I’m a bit of a sucker for gadgets of any kind. With this in mind, I decided to try out the above device after hearing raves from a close friend of mine. The Hot Logic mini is a single-serving conduction oven, apparently made of some sort of nylon on the outside, and aluminum lining on the inside. The operative element is a hot plate placed inside the container. It is small and convenient for transportation, and the Hot Logic makers advertise it as a great alternative for people who lunch at work. By the way, you can also purchase a vehicular converter from the manufacturer if you want to heat food in your car.

The mini oven is sold on amazon.com, along with a Pyrex container, for approximately $55.00. This does not included shipping costs. Dimensions are 10″x7.5″. The Pyrex container is rectangular and holds 6 cups. Specs indicate the nylon case can hold a container up to 8.75″x6.75″x2.5″. You can purchase the entire set for a comparable price at
https://myhotlogic.com.

The American-based makers of this product state that one can heat frozen food and leftover refrigerated food with the device. They also claim that you can use the Hot Logic mini to cook certain foods from scratch. Well, that remains to be seen. However, I did try it with a frozen Saffron Road lamb dish that I purchased at Sprouts.

Although the specs say that the above food item can be directly placed in the oven, cardboard box and all, I decided to play it safe and use the Pyrex container.

Frozen lamb and rice prior to cooking

I placed the food in the Pyrex dish, sealed it with the plastic top, put the Pyrex in the mini oven, zipped everything closed, and plugged ‘er in. Two hours later, here are the results:

Lamb and rice after cooking

The lamb was hot, moist, tender and delicious. The side dish was just okay, but I suspect that the quality of the rice was more at fault than the Hot Logic device. At any rate, the food was more than adequately heated, and it tasted great. Also, I noted that the outside of the nylon oven was not hot, not even near the point of contact with the hot plate.  This would support the manufacturers’ claim that the oven can be safely plugged into a car. Finally, there were no food odors until I opened the device at completion of cooking. This tells me that the mini oven can be used at the work site without bothering one’s neighbors.

You will be hearing more about the Hot Logic Mini as I experiment and try more dishes.

Book Review: “Beating the Lunch Box Blues”

I found Beating the Lunch Box Blues by J.M. Hirsch several years ago while looking for interesting ways to change up my brown bag lunches. I must say that this collection of recipes is quite a gem.

At the time of publication, Mr. Hirsch was the food editor for the Associated Press. He was also dealing with a picky nine-year old son who refused to accept PB&J’s every day for lunch. While acknowledging the limitations that most parents/full-time workers have in preparing lunches for themselves and their children, Hirsch came up with some innovative ways to make meals interesting and easy to prepare.

Pluses: Beating meets my primary requisite for a good cookbook: Lots.Of.Photos. Even better, Hirsch bubbles in useful comments and directions amid his artfully staged pics:

Another plus: Hirsch includes examples of dinner time meals that can be packed for lunch the next day. He is careful to describe # of servings for each recipe. Below, you can see Hirsch’s recipe for Roasted Chicken Thighs with Garlicky White Beans. Easy to make, and interesting ways to use the leftovers. I cooked this dish myself; it’s not bad.

Finally, I love Hirsch’s innovation in deconstructing classic sandwiches and remaking them into salads. Below is just one example of many:

Minus. Hirsch recommends using a heated Thermos for meats, pastas, and other relatively dry dishes listed elsewhere in his book. In my experience, even the most effective Thermos works best with liquidy foods like soup, stew, and brothy noodles. Otherwise, the food just doesn’t stay warm over a long period of time. I would suggest using a Crockpot Lunch Warmer to heat meats, pastas, pizzas, sandwiches, rice dishes, etc. in this book. Please see “Gadgets” under my Category section for information re: the Crockpot Warmer.

If you are interested in purchasing Beating the Lunch Box Blues, it is sold hardcopy on amazon.com.